Monday, May 14, 2012

Vitiligo and gluten intolerance

The amount of gluten in our diet is greater than that of our ancestors. Part of the reason for this is the replacement of traditional wheat strains with new ones containing higher amounts of gluten.
These days we eat not only bread, but breakfast cereals made from wheat, and processed foods with gluten added to them. Even pharmaceuticals and shampoos contain gluten.
Some people who have both vitiligo and gluten intolerance, and have gone on gluten free diets have noticed that their white patches have reduced in size or even disappeared.
Here's a link to an interesting article about Vitiligo, celiac disease and gluten intolerance:
vitiligo and gluten intolerance

12 comments:

  1. I actually do a range of things to take good care of my facial skin, which includes a few
    of your own suggestions. Getting sufficient sleep at night, a wholesome
    diet, taking in enough water and guarding yourself from the sunlight would be the simplest things
    to do and may help a great deal. Furthermore, I avoid using too many products, I simply make certain that I clean my facial skin regularly and use a skin moisturizer.
    This appears to work for me!
    My page > Jane Jones

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  2. I did stop gluten and started repigmenting! a side effect I was not ready to see. I had vitiligo for 40+ years and I'm repigmenting now,we are finding more evidence that wheat is causing a whole range of autoinmune diseases...

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    1. How strict were you with avoiding gluten. I've been researching. Gluten is in salad dressing, ketchup and other things that I would have never thought contained gluten. I'm starting this, but I don't know how strict I need to be.

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    2. Hi. Thanks for commenting. I must admit that I'm not very strict about avoiding gluten, and yes, it is in just about everything. I cannot say for certain that gluten is causing or contributing to my vitiligo, but if I eat too much gluten I tend to get digestive problems, and maybe over a long period this causes vitamin deficiencies. The less gluten I consume, the better I feel in general. Tolerance to gluten seems to vary a lot between people, so you may have to just experiment to see how it effects you. The main thing is that you should have good digestive health to have healthy skin. A probiotic might cancel out the bad effects of a little gluten in your diet here an there. For me it seems that I can tolerate gluten now and then if I give my system a break from it for periods.

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  3. Thanks for commenting. It's good to get stories of people repigmenting. I have been avoiding wheat products for a couple of years, but not very strictly. My vitiligo seems to have stopped spreading and my other autoimmune issues (occasional eye and joint inflammation) seem to have improved a lot too. I will try to eliminate wheat altogether, and see if I get more improvement.
    It's not easy avoiding wheat though - it's in so many things.

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  4. Hi I started repigmenting after going gluten free.

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    1. Me too...I went wheat free (about 90%) in June of 2012 and by December of 2012 my vitiligo spots had started filling in slightly...my thyroid which has been low for 17 years and pain to control, also stabilized...

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  5. Thanks for letting us know about that. Hope you will get even more improvement.

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  6. I was diagnosed with Vitiligo 5 years ago, it started on my face and spread to my hands, feet, hips, elbows and legs. Atleast 40% of my face was completely white and after going gluten-free for just 2 months, my face is 90% filled in again. I truly cannot believe it. Any temptation of eating gluten is gone just by looking at my spots being filled in. The face is a lot easier to repigment, hands and feet are the most difficult. The rest of my body is slowly freckling but the tremendous improvement on my face is remarkable. I take vitamin d, b6 and folic acid supplements daily as well. My diet is essentially gluten-free, low carb and high protein.

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  7. Dear Anonymous and others, Please...I need more information. I have had vitiligo for 35 years. It has been very active at times and then very quiet with no spreading for months too. It's so unpredictable and can get worse and better on the same diet! What am I doing wrong? Are you all still gluten free? Has your vitiligo continued to repigment? Are you at a standstill? I need an update as this thread is rather old. Is gluten free still working?

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    1. Hi, I too am very curious about gluten-free diets. I have had vitiligo for 24 years now, and only recently has it been spreading wildly throughout my entire body and face. I am on day 3 of the gluten free diet and can say it is hard finding foods that are free of gluten. I recommend two smart phone apps: "shop well" (it allows you to scan bar codes to check for gluten) and "gluten free! Nom nom" it has lots of recipes. I am very new at this and will post again as soon as I determine if this helps. I will also begin taking vitamin supplements again. Good luck to all of you!

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  8. Hi Alli and Kate. Thank you for sharing your experiences. I read recently that it can take weeks, even months, for the body to rid itself of the effects of gluten. So if you are going gluten-free as an experiment, you need to keep the experiment going strictly for at least four or five weeks. Then perhaps reintroduce gluten and see what happens. I am very hesitant to recommend a gluten-free diet, as I have no scientific proof it works. But there does seem to be a lot of anecdotal evidence that it helps. Please visit again and give us an update.

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